Nostalgic Tablerunner: Finished!

Nostalgic TablerunnerThis morning I finished binding the tablerunner while waiting for a query to run for work. Then I had to re-run the query for work because something barfed in my computer, but that’s neither here nor there.

The total project measures 58″ x 23″ (I think – don’t quote me on that), and was made from a charm pack, panel, and vintage postcard print from the Sentiments line by 3 Sisters from Moda.  I took the panel and cut it up and got one of each of the 6 postcards to embroider the names of my female relatives on my mom’s side. Since this is for my aunt, I used me, my sister, my mom, my 2 cousins and my grandmother’s signatures gathered from various family records and mildly suspicious emails sent to my cousin promising not to steal her identify if she would just please send me her autograph.

I also used green from my stash to set the postcards wonky and for the binding, and some red for the final outer border.

Here’s a picture of the quilting/embroidery detail on the postcard I “signed” (click through to visit flickr and enlarge).
Nostalgic Tablerunner
I used a new (to me) quilting pattern from the Angela Walters book. On a the scale of Jacked Up Quilting that goes from “Eh… not bad” to “OY VEY”, I give it a “Huh”.  I like the texture, and I like it for smaller quilts since I find that quilting patterns that repeat on themselves frustrate me with the seeming lack of progress, of which pebbling is the extreme. You can also see a bit of the quilting on the HST border, but here’s a better shot of that.
Nostalgic Tablerunner
I drew that heart and the fans, and just free-handed the fans in the white part of the HSTs to match.
Nostalgic Tablerunner

For the back, I used the postal print from the line along with some additional charm pack squares to make it the right length.

Phantom quilt view, taken from behind facing the sun!

Boo Bunting with Charm Squares

I wanted to have my Baltimore Halloween quilt done this week, so of course I stalled and worked on something else instead. I picked up a charm pack of a Moda Halloween fabric by Sanae a couple years ago (don’t know the name anymore), and wanted to use it for something and finally decided on a bunting to hang above our fireplace in the living room.

Imagine how warm and toasty it is in front of our fake fireplace!
Here’s a close-up of two of the flags.  The letters are fused on, but not stitched around. I figured since this isn’t a “washing” project, I didn’t need to do that extra bit.  The two pumpkins and ghost are not appliqued – they were done by sandwiching two pieces right sides together with a layer of batting, stitching around the shape, and turning it right side out.  Faces were put on using fusible, but again not stitched.
Boo Bunting - Close-up

Here’s the graph paper I used to figure out the layout. I arranged the three charm squares per the layout below: two on top, and one centered on the bottom in 100% scale on the graph paper. I then drew a line from the middle of the bottom square to the 1/4″ inside. Now, I didn’t use this as a template to cut the flags; instead I used it to figure out how big to make the letters. I figured out that the letters should be 4 1/2″ tall for this size flag, which comes out to 8 1/4″ wide and 8 1/2″ tall.  I then used Microsoft Powerpoint (the presentation software) to get the letters I needed, and then reversed the image when printing.

Boo Bunting Layout 

So I bet you’re saying to yourself, “There’s no “L” in “BOO”.” And you’re right! Go have a cookie. I wanted this to be multi-purpose, so I made the other side Thanksgiving-themed

Gobble Bunting

The Gobble side does not use charm squares, rather single cuts of the same fabric. Those measurements from above came in handy!  In total, this project used 18 charm squares and 1/4 yard of Thanksgiving-y fabric, plus the fabric for the letters.

To join the flags, I matched up the two sides wrong sides together (be careful since you’re pairing the first flag of one with the last flag of the other side, otherwise you’ll get a “BOO” side and a “ELBBOG” side), and stitched along the sides with a 3/8″ seam allowance (I left the tops unstitched since they were sewn shut with the string part). I then used my pinking shears to trim the edges so they wouldn’t ravel (you can see than in the close-up picture above).

To get them on the string, I measured a 67″ length of bias tape, and folded it over so it would encase the tops of the flags.  On each end I folded it so it made a loop (this is hung on cuphooks screwed into the shelves under the TV – I am committed!), and started stitching to secure the loop and then across each of the flags to the other end. I went slowly to make sure I was catching both sides of the bias tape and the flags themselves, and then I turned around and went back the other direction about 1/8″ apart from the first line of stitching.  Since it’s bias tape I didn’t want it stretching out, hence the double stitching.

I’ve got flags cut out for a Saint Patrick’s bunting, and I’ll pair it with an Easter theme on the other side. I haven’t decided if I’ll use letters on it or not – maybe “Lucky” for the St Paddy’s day side? Not sure about Easter, but I can do yo-yo’s in gold fabric to dress up the shamrocks, and for Easter I can do applique bunnies. I’ll also have a birthday one, but am not sure what to put on the other side – maybe I’ll do a girl birthday side and a boy birthday side.